Participants

Alex Ahmed is a third-year doctoral student in Personal Health Informatics at Northeastern University, which is a joint program between the computer science and health science departments. She is committed to developing and contributing to projects that engage participatory research methods to create person-facing health technologies, which center the individual rather than medical institutions or professionals. During her second year, she was awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship for work that aims to use participatory design methods to create a person-facing health application for trans people. In both this workshop and in her dissertation research, she intends to apply and develop her skills in statistical analysis, study design, information visualization, programming and application development. More broadly, she wants to direct the resources of academic institutions toward advancing social justice and health equity. Trans Women’s Health (position paper).

Shaowen Bardzell is Associate Professor of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University. Her research explores the contributions of design, feminism, and social science to support technology’s role in social change. Recent research foci have included criticality in design, care ethics and feminist utopian perspectives on IT, and culture and creative industries in Asia. Co-author Moving Genders: Body Hacking and Care of the Self (position paper).

Rosie Bellini is a Doctoral Trainee in Digital Civics at Open Lab, Newcastle University. She has  a philosophy background, with specific interests in the commodification of the body, political philosophy and aesthetics. Her current research interests are in local democracy and how technology can be used to support individuals within these groups. Broader interests include: Identity formation and methods of communication within social activism groups; The ways in which technology can be used to quantify the body; Women’s rights, gender, sexuality and health. (video)

Fredrik Bergstrand has an academic background in software engineering, mobile services, and is currently in the final phase of his informatics PhD project. Fredrik has chosen a design oriented research approach, focusing on how new technologies affects sensemaking. Fredrik also enjoys hacking gardens and hardware. Cyclic Peaking: A Human Centered Design Project on the Menstrual Cycle (position paper).

Elizabeth (Beth) Bonsignore is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Maryland’s Human-Computer Interaction Lab and College of Information Studies. Her research focuses on the design of technology-mediated social experiences that promote new media literacies, arts-integrated science learning, and participatory cultures for youth. This work involves close co-design partnerships with children, teens, and their families. Maiden, Mother, Crone: the influence of digital marketing on women’s health information seeking during life transitions (video).

Daniel Epstein is a Ph.D. student at the University of Washington, co-advised by James Fogarty and Sean Munson. He explores how personal informatics and self-tracking tools can better integrate into people’s everyday lives. He uses varied methods to explore design opportunities, including surveys and interviews, prototyping, and web and app development. Exploring New Design Directions for Menstrual Tracking Technology (position paper).

Anya Ernest has a background within the advertising industry, and a keen interest in gender issues and service design. She has a researcher at RISE Interactive raised awareness regarding gender issues, and started several projects that question established gender stand points. One recent activity is the event Innovate Passion where the ambition is to support girls to ideate within their passion by the help of technology. Co-author  Cyclic Peaking: A Human Centered Design Project on the Menstrual Cycle (position paper).

Sarah Fox is a PhD candidate in the Tactile and Tactical (TAT) Design Lab at the University of Washington. Drawing on feminist theory, science and technology studies, and design studies her research examines how feminist ideas move through technology cultures. Her work has earned Best Paper awards at CSCW and DIS and a Best Paper Honorable Mention at CHI. Menstrual Extraction: Self-study and control in the age of the period app (position paper).

Rachel Hanebutt is currently a Master’s candidate in the Civic Media, Art and Practice Program at Emerson College. She received a Master’s of Education in Mind, Brain, and Education from the Harvard Graduate School and holds a Bachelors of Arts from DePauw University. Rachel’s Master’s thesis is currently a collaboration with Confi, LLC, a digital health content provider founded out of the Harvard Business School Innovation Lab. Confi provides information on sensitive health topics and utilizes crowdsourcing mechanisms and engaging infographics and data visualizations to effectively communicate sexual health information to users. This model has been replicated in the study of sexual assault on college campuses, and seeks to promote more frequent and reliable sexual health and safety surveys for individual colleges and student populations. Confidence and Confidential: Sexual Health Information for Students, by Students (position paper).

Sydney Hessel is a User Experience (UX) Researcher + Design Sprint Master hybrid excited about creating awesome experiences through highly collaborative, user-centered methods. She has been at Google for 4+ years, focusing on many different aspects of UX – including product design research, operations management, and approaches to design collaboration. Feminist Design Sprints: A Method to Facilitate Women’s Health Technology Development (position paper).

Sarah Homewood‘s  background is in dance and performance art. She has worked with performance and embodied practices within interaction design for the past 4 years as a part-time researcher with Professor Susan Kozel. She graduated from the Masters in Interaction Design from Malmö University in August last year. She is interested in exploring the value of applying embodied and performance-based practices to draw out lived experiences with women-related technologies and the value of speculative design to make tangible, and therefore criticisable, future technologies that could effect women’s lives. Contraception and Hormones within Interaction Design (position paper).

Fiona Jardine is a doctoral student at the iSchool, University of Maryland, College Park. Co-author Maiden, Mother, Crone: the influence of digital marketing on women’s health information seeking during life transitions (video).

Gagan Jindal is a first-year doctoral student at the iSchool, University of Maryland, College Park. Co-author Maiden, Mother, Crone: the influence of digital marketing on women’s health information seeking during life transitions (video).

Szu-Yu (Cyn) Liu is a Ph.D. student in the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University and a member of the CRIT (Cultural Research in Technology) group. Before returning to academia to pursue a PhD degree, she worked as a strategic designer and user experience researcher at ASUS Design Center in Taipei, Taiwan. An award-winning product designer, Liu’s current research focuses on maker culture, creativity support tools, and aesthetic interaction. Moving Genders: Body Hacking and Care of the Self (position paper).

Lydia Michie is a Doctoral Trainee in Digital Civics at Open Lab, Newcastle University where her research interest is in designing technologies for women’s health and marginalised communities. She holds a BA in Human Geography where my qualitative research focused on access and attitudes to sex education in the Bible Belt. She also holds a Master of Public Health where she worked with community/third sector organisations to identify the barriers to accessing and supporting women and girls who have undergone Female Genital Mutilation in the UK. A HCI Lens on Unsafe Abortion (position paper).

Nikki Newhouse is a Medical Research Council-funded PhD candidate within the Faculty of Engineering at University College London and a qualitative researcher with the Health Experiences Research Group at the University of Oxford. Her PhD research is situated at the intersection of public health and HCI and focuses on the role of technology in the transition to first time motherhood. Her interdisciplinary research utilizes best practice from traditionally siloed paradigms and translates it into pragmatic digital solutions that are fit for purpose and grounded in contextualized needs. Becoming Mother: Designing Online Resources That Support And Empower (position paper).

Sarah Ng is a M.S. student in HCI Design at the Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing. A
member of the CRIT group, Ng’s interests include gender and design, making/fabrication, and strategic design. Co-author Moving Genders: Body Hacking and Care of the Self (position paper).
Chukwuemeka Onuorah is currently a master’s candidate in computer science at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria. He holds a Bachelor Degree in Computer science and Information Technology from Caritas University Enugu, Nigeria. Chukwuemeka’s research interest is in the area of Human Computer Interaction Design focusing on issues related to usability, user experience and user centered designs. He is currently working on his thesis ” Mobile Application for Maternal and Infant Health in Rural Nigeria; Using a User Centered Design Approach”. Mobile Application for Maternal and Infant Health in Rural Africa (position paper).

Matt Rafalow is a Sociologist (PhD, University of California-Irvine) and a social scientist at Google (YouTube). He is currently lead YouTube’s research program on all things gaming and live experience. In his academic work, he primarily studies how youth/young adults adopt digital technologies, though he also examines particular uses of tech with colleagues in other research areas (education, dating, organizations, and innovation). Co-author Feminist Design Sprints: A Method to Facilitate Women’s Health Technology Development (position paper).

Burgan Shealy is an Interaction Designer at Google. Co-author Feminist Design Sprints: A Method to Facilitate Women’s Health Technology Development (position paper).

Beth St. Jean is an Assistant Professor specializing in health informatics at the iSchool, University of Maryland, College Park. Co-author Maiden, Mother, Crone: the influence of digital marketing on women’s health information seeking during life transitions (video).